Four Easy Steps to Hang a Basket Wall

Hanging baskets on the wall is a clever and easy way to create texture and interest on an otherwise plain wall. Their three-dimensional shape provides more depth than a standard gallery wall, and their woven, natural texture brings a little bit of nature indoors.

By following these four quick and easy steps, you’ll have an interesting and one-of-a-kind focal point that will elevate your space. The total amount of time you’ll need is less than one hour!

The Supplies You’ll Need

FISHING LINE

I like this one from Amazon, which is a durable and clear plastic thread. The spool is less than $10 and you’ll have enough to seriously hang hundreds of baskets!

Four Easy Steps to Hang a Basket Wall - Using this fishing line is my trick to hanging baskets on the wall. It's inexpensive and easy to use. | Meridian
Using this fishing line is my trick to hanging baskets on the wall. It’s inexpensive and easy to use.

HOOKS OR NAILS

You’ll want to choose a hook or nail that works best for you and your wall. Most people simply use small nails or picture hangers for this, and that’s the easiest option because they are small and flat. If you’re opposed to nails in your wall, 3M makes small Command Hooks that won’t damage your wall.

You’ll want to choose something that can get pretty flat, as you’ll want to avoid bulk behind your basket.

Some people simply nail a basket straight onto the wall, but I’ve found that causes some damage to the basket, and I don’t love that the nail head is visible on the front side of the basket.

If you combine the nail/hook with the fishing line, you’ll create a seamless hang for the baskets that comes across as professional and smooth.  

BASKETS

This is the fun part! As with most vignettes, stick with odd numbers for the biggest impact. Odd numbers let your eye move around a collection, and don’t let it settle on something static. This creates an illusion of space, and helps make a grouping of items look finished.

Four Easy Steps to Hang a Basket Wall - Stick with odd numbers for the biggest impact. | Meridian
Stick with odd numbers for the biggest impact.

Threes and Fives are your best bet because it’s just enough to cover some space without feeling too overpowering.

I love to mix and match patterns and sizes, as again this helps create movement within your collection. Otherwise, it could look a little too repetitive. You’re going for originality and uniqueness here! The best part about these Woven Palm Baskets is that you can really combine any of the patterns and sizes, and they all go together smoothly.

Four Easy Steps to Hang a Basket Wall - Take a cue from Meridian Collector Janis Snell, and mix and match designs of natural and neutral Woven Palm Baskets. | Meridian
Take a cue from Meridian Collector Janis Snell, and mix and match designs of natural and neutral Meridian Woven Palm Baskets.

As you can see, there is no right or wrong here. As long as you include variety, every grouping looks great together.

How to Hang Baskets on the Wall

Follow these easy steps:

STEP ONE: Lay the baskets on the floor, so you can see the patterns together. On the floor, you can play around with spacing and make sure you get it to a point where you like it before you put any holes in your wall. I find it helps to snap a photo of your final layout on your phone, so you have something to reference as you start to hang the baskets.

Four Easy Steps to Hang a Basket Wall - Start with your design on the floor, before you make any holes in your wall. | Meridian
Start with your design on the floor, before you make any holes in your wall.

STEP TWO: Begin with your largest basket, or the basket that is most center in your layout. Hold it up to the light and see the open parts of the weave in the center of your basket. Thread the fishing line through so that the open end of your loop is on the backside of the basket.

Four Easy Steps to Hang a Basket Wall - Thread the fishing line through the open weaves of the front of the basket, so that the open ends of your loop are on the back. | Meridian
Thread the fishing line through the open weaves of the front of the basket, so that the open ends of your loop are on the back.

You’ll want to center the loop as best you can so that the basket lays flat against the wall.

I like to thread all of my baskets at one time so that they are ready to hang in a batch. After you’ve threaded your main basket, set up the others so that they are all at the same step.

Tie a double knot on the backside of each basket loop. The smaller the loop, the tighter the hang will be on the wall.

Four Easy Steps to Hang a Basket Wall - Center the fishing line loop on your basket, and tie it as tightly as you can. This way, the basket will lay flat against your wall. | Meridian
If you secure the fishing line tightly onto your basket, it will be nearly invisible from the front.

STEP THREE: Hang that first basket using a small nail or picture hanger behind the center of the basket. Now that you have one basket up on the wall, it’s easy to add the others because you’ve got a marker already in place.

I prefer to keep baskets “hugging” each other on the wall, rather than spreading them out too far. When the baskets are placed close to one another, it feels like a complete installation rather than something piece-meal.

Four Easy Steps to Hang a Basket Wall - Keep baskets "hugging" each other rather than spreading them out too far. This will make your design feel more like a complete installation rather than something piece-meal. | Meridian
Keep baskets “hugging” each other rather than spreading them out too far. This will make your design feel more like a complete installation rather than something piece-meal.

STEP FOUR: Continue to hang the remaining baskets. That’s it!

Four Easy Steps to Hang a Basket Wall - Hanging baskets on the wall is a clever and easy way to create texture and interest on an otherwise plain wall. | Meridian
Hanging baskets on the wall is a clever and easy way to create texture and interest on an otherwise plain wall.

Shop our collection of Woven Palm Baskets, and learn more about the women’s group who weaves them in Northern Zimbabwe.

Top photo by Meridian Collector Janis Snell.

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